Moss on a Tree

2017 Flora Roundup!

I love getting outside to poke around and see what’s there, what piques my interest. I’m always hoping for interesting mushrooms, seed pods, spiders or insects. I didn’t shoot outdoors quite as much last year as in previous years; I’ll try to do better this year. Hopefully it will be a mild summer! I daydream about living somewhere where the daytime high temperatures in the summer don’t rise above the low 80s and it doesn’t feel like the humidity is trying to strangle you =) Here are some of last year’s plants and fungi…(insects, lizards and birds will be in the next post).

▲ A seed sheeth still attached to the cotyledons of either a cucumber or a cantaloupe seedling . Photographed in early March.

▲ New Dogwood leaves in the spring. Photographed in late March.

▲ Early spring in the vegetable garden. The dark purple flowers are salvia (for attracting pollinators), the lavender flowers are on the chives and the out-of-focus green leaves in the foreground are beets! Photographed in early April.

This is Euphorbia ‘Tiny Tim.’ The euphorbiaceae, or spurge, family is quite large and contains more than 7,500 species, ranging from small, flowering annuals to cacti-like members (not true cacti, though) to large trees! Photographed in early April.

▲ Trillium luteum, also known as Yellow Trillium or Yellow Wakerobin. It’s native to and common in parts of Georgia, North Carolina, Tennessee and Kentucky. I photographed this on in my parent’s backyard. Photographed in mid-April.

▲ These are the berries of my Jack-in-the-Pulpit (Arisaema triphyllum) (seen in this post from almost two years ago). Photographed in early May and late July.

▲ Early evening roses…Photographed in early May.

▲ One of the advantages to growing plants in pots is that you can move them around when you want to take their picture! I moved my Autumn Fern (Dryopteris erythrosora) so that it could be back-lit by the sun. I love photographing plants this way – you can see detail in the leaves that you can’t see otherwise and sometimes leaf colors can appear to be quite different from what you’re expecting! Photographed in early May.

▲ An Autumn Fern (Dryopteris erythrosora) back-lit by the sun. Photographed in early May.

▲ Overlapping fronds of an Autumn Fern (Dryopteris erythrosora) back-lit by the sun. Photographed in early May.

▲ An Autumn Fern (Dryopteris erythrosora), this time in black & white, back-lit by the sun. Photographed in early May.

▲ One more Autumn Fern (Dryopteris erythrosora) in black & white, back-lit by the sun. Photographed in early May.

▲ New growth on an Autumn Fern (Dryopteris erythrosora). Native to eastern Asia. Photographed in early June.

▲ I grew cantaloupes last year and it was a success! Photographed throughout June.

▲ I honestly couldn’t believe it when I cut my first cantaloupe open and it was nice and orange inside – and so sweet! It tasted just like it was supposed to =) Photographed in early July.

▲ Believe it or not that orange stringy stuff is a plant! It’s called dodder and it’s a parasite. There are up to 170 different species of dodder – I’m not sure what this one is, specifically. Once a dodder seed germinates is starts to look for a host. It needs to find one one within 5-10 days or the seedling will die. Once it finds a host it produces a haustorium that it uses to attach itself to the host plant. At this point the root of the original seedling dies and the dodder is now dependent upon its host. In colder climates dodder is an annual and dies back over the winter, but seeds (it produces small flowers during it’s growing cycle) can remain dormant in the soil for many years. Photographed in early August near the Chattahoochee River.

▲ Possibly a Parasol Mushroom…photographed with my phone, converted to black & white and edited for contrast. Photographed in mid-August.

▲ I photographed this shelf-like mushroom near the Chattahoochee River, not far from where I live. It was a bit too far away for me to get a closer shot! I think it’s a polypore mushroom from the genus Trametes, but I’m still working on the full identification. I remember where I photographed it so I’ll look again this year, and also take note of what kind of tree it was growing on, since that can help with identification. I’ll also try to get a more useful picture! Photographed in late August.

▲ This is lichen growing on the side of a tree. Lichen is not a single organism! Lichen has a fungal component and an algal or algae component. Taxonomically they are categorized based on their fungal component. The relationship between the two organisms is mutualistic, meaning that they both benefit. There are more than 20,000 known species of lichen!…Photographed in late August.

▲ Moss growing on the side of a tree. Photographed in late August.

▲ A Passion Flower, most likely Passiflora incarnata. Photographed in late August.

▲ Spotted Jewelweed or Touch-Me-Not, also known as Impatiens capensis. Photographed in late August.

▲ Look at that glow…Photographed in late August.

Expansive Woodstock Property

January 31, 2018 HDR, Real Estate 0 Comments

I got the chance to photograph this amazing, sprawling property in Woodstock, GA last August.  It is situated just outside of Roswell (the eastern property line is the Fulton / Cobb County border) on 12 acres and it was a treat to get to photograph it.

Looking out towards the back of the property from just outside the living room french doors.

Super fancy pants door knobs!

Elegant & Updated Home in Roswell, GA

November 2, 2017 HDR, Real Estate 0 Comments

I photographed this Roswell, GA home that overlooks the Chattahoochee River back in March. You can easily see the river from the window over the kitchen sink, the sun room and the deck (as well as other rooms not pictured here). The house was completely updated and most of the finishes were neutral, with a few exceptions, which are usually a bit easier to photograph and edit than very colorful rooms.

Custom Cabinet Photography

Custom Cabinet Photography

Every time I photograph a carefully staged home I am, to some degree or another, photographing somebody’s interior design. However, I haven’t actually done much straight up interior design photography. My main focus is usually to show potential buyers how all of the rooms flow together, how the spaces relate to each other. In this case I was photographing a kitchen and bathroom for a cabinet designer. Since the kitchen/living/dining area was open plan there were a lot of angles to choose from. The only difference between photographing this kitchen and a kitchen for a traditional real estate listing was that I was trying to make sure certain design elements were visible in each shot. Usually I’m trying to make sure doorways to other rooms are clearly visible.

I really enjoyed photographing this kitchen and bathroom, partially because of the beautiful design and partially because I felt very focused while creating the images. I will be adding a couple of these images to my portfolio!

Custom Blue and White Kitchen Cabinets

Custom Blue and White Kitchen Cabinets

This shot shows a clear view of the range hood over the stove. I like the industrial touch of the copper, drop-down canister lights.

Custom White Kitchen Cabinets

A close up of the cabinets around the stove and range hood.

Custom Cabinet Photography

This shot shows how the farmhouse sink fits into the island.

Custom White Kitchen Cabinets

Built-in wine storage.

Gray Bathroom Cabinets

Gray Bathroom Cabinets

Master bathroom vanity cabinets.

Close-up showing the featured base cabinets and all of the built-in wine storage.

Photographing Properties in Texas!

March 31, 2017 HDR, Real Estate 0 Comments

(Commercial Real Estate Photography) – This past November I traveled to Texas to photograph 20 properties for a client. I drove about 1100 miles in two and a half days driving from Houston to Dallas to San Antonio and back to Houston. The days were long and I slept like a log when I got home, but I actually enjoy doing this kind of work. I’m at the mercy of the weather, but otherwise I have control over the pace and I can usually just keep shooting until I’m certain that I have the shots that I need.  Some properties are easy and don’t take too long and others are more complicated (sun location, people, cars, etc.).  I love not feeling rushed.  And I enjoy the several days of editing that I have to do when I get home.

The week after I arrived home from Texas I headed off in my car with my trusty step-ladder to photograph two properties in LaGrange and Albany, GA and one in Jacksonville, FL.  I returned home two days before Thanksgiving and slept (driving always makes me tired)!

Below are some of my favorite shots (with notes in the captions).  I have now photographed 53 properties in nine states for this particular client!  Hopefully I’ll be adding more states and properties to that count this year!

This Buffalo Wild Wings was on my favorite buildings to photograph on this particular trip. The light that morning was soft and pleasant and lined up nicely with this property. And I love the yellow paint around the entrance to the building – it really makes the photo pop.

I love the light in this shot, too, and the landscaping. The tree on the right is perfect.

This was CarMax was the first property that I photographed on the first day and it went pretty smoothly.

Fast food locations are always a bit tricky due to the constant car and foot traffic. Sometimes I don’t have any choice but to photograph the property with cars in the drive through. I also had to remove a large advertising banner from this shot.

On the other hand, photographing movie theaters during the day is usually really easy!

I wanted to line this shot up just a little differently but there was a large, blue pickup truck right in front of the building that was distracting so I hid it behind the sign in the foreground.

This is the only property that I have ever photographed where the property manager came out and offered to sweep the parking lot so the pictures would look better!

This photo was taken just after sunset…

…and this one was taken 16 minutes later. I love the way the color of the sky changes.